Untapping the Skills Within

Art exists in many forms and evokes different meanings for different people. Room 10 explores the idea that everything can be art.

Room 10 have been using the following quote by Scott Adams “ Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep”. We knew that we needed to try a range of different artists styles before perfecting one style for sharing at our Celebrtions of Learning day where parents and visitors are coming together to see our art.

Students who love maths found that shapes, angles, areas, measurements, and equations can create unique art forms. Like the shapes in Wassily Kandinsky's abstract artwork we created our own using geometric and organic shapes.  

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Caleb: I used shapes and colours to create art that looks different for everyone.

Quade: I found abstract art the easiest as I could use geometry and lines to make something enjoyable.

It is important to be able to read and measure millilitres correctly. Using eye droppers with millilitre measurements and a cap measurement of 5ml to measure the volume of colours. Students chose a selection of primary colours, and adding white and black, to create different tones. This was for the purpose of creatingr orginal colours to use in our art work. Setting to work, on the recipes for our colour creations was our first step.

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Danielle: Making my colours was a great experience. My colour recipes created excellent colours.

Trend: The colours I created came out better than I expected. Unfortunately, my recipes weren’t as easy to follow as during my creation period someone dropped a mystery amount of colour onto my tray, and wham, it created my fantastic colour. Still, I couldn’t reproduce the colour again.

Students learnt about different artists such as the Impressionist, Claude Monet and had fun creating their impressionism pieces of art.

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Joseph: The frog pond was hard for me to do. I liked it in the end.

Tane: Claude was an artist who painted the impression things gave him. This style was one I enjoyed.

By exploring pop art students  turned onomatopoeia into art pieces. Onomatopoeia are words you can hear and see that make an impact. Students took inspiration from the pop artists and how they had used words within their work.

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Evie: The freedom to cut and create onomatopoeia words was a fun exercise. I used a lot of texture and colour to make mine stand out.

Dane: You must consider each layer so that they pop against each other.

Creating art  was hard work with a rewarding end product, resulting in 3D animal sculptures that had depth and details using single pieces of wire. Students found the manuilpution of the wire challenge and needed support to achieve the end result.

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Sofie: I think the first wire I used was way more rigid than the second one and also chose a complex shape. In the end, it made it look great when finished. Everyone that has seen it knows what it is.

Brooke: It was hard at first to bend the wire to make the shape of an elephant. Once I got started, it started to look like an elephant.

Keywords;   Mathematics, integration, literacy, technology, Visual art

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